JCI approved neurosurgeons providing Less price Gamma knife radio surgery in India

Source: PR-inside.com (Original Article)

Affordable Gamma knife radio surgery in India is considered to be the preferred treatment for the brain tumors, arteriovenous malformations and brain dysfunctions.

India, which is one of the most sought medical tourism destinations in the world, has patients from over 60 countries getting gamma knife radio surgery in various hospitals at Mumbai and Delhi having recognized neurosurgeons who are among the world’s best are recognized by JCI for their quality services given to the patients. The Gamma knife radio surgery in India offers a non-invasive alternative for many patients for whom traditional brain surgery is not an option. Gamma knife radio surgery removes the physical trauma and the majority of risks associated with conventional surgery. Gamma knife radio surgery represents a major advance in brain surgery, and in the last three decades has changed the landscape within the field of neurosurgery. Its development has enhanced neurosurgical treatments offered to patients with brain tumors and vascular malformations by providing a safe, accurate and reliable treatment option.

Gamma knife radio surgery enables patients to undergo a non-invasive form of brain surgery without surgical risks, a long hospital stay or subsequent rehabilitation. Like other radio surgery, Gamma knife radio surgery is unique in that no surgical incision is made to expose the inside of the brain, thereby reducing the risk of surgical complications and eliminating the side effects and dangers of general anesthesia. The "blades" of the Gamma knife radio surgery are the beams of gamma radiation programmed to target the lesion at the point where they intersect. In a single treatment session, 201 beams of gamma radiation focus precisely on the lesion. Over time, most lesions slowly decrease in size and dissolve. The exposure is brief and only the tissue being treated receives a significant radiation dose, while the surrounding tissue remains unharmed. The advantages of gamma knife radio surgery are that it is a neurosurgical tool designed exclusively for the treatment of brain disorders; the lesion being treated receives a high dose of radiation with minimum risk to nearby tissue and structures; the cost of this surgery is 25% to 30% less than traditional neurosurgery; the absence of an incision eliminates the risk of hemorrhage and infection.

India is on verge of becoming the global health destination. Medical treatment in India is done in cities like Mumbai and Delhi offer world class medical healthcare facilities to international patients who wish to have their gamma knife radio surgery in India. The surgery costs are very low as compared to UK and USA, with less price Indian private facilities offer advanced technology and high-quality treatment at par with hospitals in western countries. Each year thousands of international patients visit India for treatment and the numbers are expected to rise in the future. Medical tourism in India also offers tourism packages to foreign patients, so after their surgery the patients can visit to various tourist destinations for relaxation and comfort. To know more about Affordable gamma knife radio surgery in India visit us www.excelsiorindianhealthcare.com/ or you can send us your queries at enquiry@excelsiorindianhealthcare.com. You can also call us at +91- 7798122756.

Gamma Knife Surgery Harrisburg

 

More Details about Gamma Knife Surgery Harrisburg here.


The diagnosis of breast cancer is not an easy one to cope with. Physical changes, exhaustion, nausea and pain from treatment, as well as changes to self-image, low energy, and the emotional turmoil the diagnosis causes can put strain on any intimate relationship. Maintaining a relationship when a diagnosis of breast cancer has been made is challenging, and the change in a couple's sex life may further disrupt the relationship. In order to remain close during this time, it is imperative that partners have strong, open communication with one another.
Breast cancer adds more distractions to already busy lives, making it difficult to find time to spend together. Even when partners are able to find time to sit down with one another, interruptions may hinder any serious discussion. However, when a partner has been diagnosed with breast cancer, finding time to talk is extremely important. It may be necessary for couples to schedule time together in a quiet place, free of distractions and interruptions.
Even when couples find time together, talking about the issues surrounding the diagnosis and the importance of the relationship can be difficult. These are serious topics of conversation, and as such partners are often uncomfortable discussing them. It may be best to start with topics that are general, such as how the kids are doing at school, a family visit, or even the weather. Once the conversation is flowing, the serious topics can be gradually worked into the conversation.
Talking, even about less serious topics, is difficult for some people. It may seem frustrating when one partner appears to not want to talk. However, just because they aren't talking, doesn't mean they aren't listening. One partner may need to do most of the talking, making sure to get some sort of feedback along the way. Eye contact and physical touch can help, and feedback may take the form of physical gestures such as a comforting hug, or a squeeze of the hand.
A partner of someone diagnosed with breast cancer may feel like they have no right to burden the other with their feelings and concerns. After all, the one diagnosed with breast cancer is going through enough already. It is important that the partner be reassured that their feelings are important. Breast cancer affects both partners.
If, for any reason, a couple has trouble communicating, it may be wise to make an appointment with a therapist who can help the flow of conversation and help both partners cope with the illness together. If the help of a therapist is not something either partner is comfortable with, it may be beneficial to use the written word to communicate. Sometimes it is easier to express feelings in a letter or journal entry.
Breast cancer is a serious challenge in any relationship. Communication is key to maintaining a healthy relationship, no matter what form the communication takes. With open communication both partners can help each other cope with breast cancer, and may even emerge with a stronger relationship than ever before.




The Oakwood Cancer Center, located in Mechanicsburg, PA, offers the community the latest in Harrisburg PA Cancer Treatment technology and expertise. The clinic specializes in breast cancer treatment and gamma knife cancer surgery and serves Harrisburg and Mechanicsburg Pennsylvania. 


Contact the Author
Nick Messe

More Details about Gamma Knife Surgery Harrisburg here.

Gamma Knife Surgery - Have Brain Surgery, Be Home in Time For Dinner

Gamma Knife Surgery is not really surgery as you know it. There is no knife, no scalpel. Why did they name it Gamma Knife Surgery Beats me. But I can tell you it’s an effective tool. Take it from someone who has had their head opened up more than once. Gamma Knife patients usually waltz out of the hospital the same day and still have their hair. I walked, or rather walked gingerly to my car the week after each of my craniotomies. And my head was shaved which did not qualify me as a fashion diva. So it’s worth the effort to see if your brain tumor or brain disorder qualifies for gamma knife surgery.

It is important to note that Gamma Knife (GK) and Cyber Knife are not the same thing. The GK was specifically created, designed and built to treat brain tumors and disorders. The cyber knife was not. There are other distinctions, however, this will focus on the benefits of gamma knife and what to look for in terms of good GK treatment.

Gamma Knife Users Share Latest Advances for Treating Cancer, Other Brain Disorders at Society Meeting in Greece

Clinical centers to report on Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion work, technological benefits and broadened range of applications—including hypofractionated radiosurgery

ATLANTA and STOCKHOLM, May 12 /PRNewswire/ -- A record 332 oral and poster presentations comprise the scientific program for Elekta's 15th International Leksell Gamma Knife® Society Meeting, which convenes May 16-20 at the Athenaeum InterContinental Hotel (Athens, Greece). The most ever submitted in the society's 21-year history, the presentations also will be posted on the Elekta website after the meeting. Attendance at the conference is estimated at 500, including neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists and other medical specialists from around the world.
A major focus of the upcoming meeting will be presentations discussing how Elekta's fifth generation Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ system is benefiting radiosurgery practices.
"After two decades in clinical practice, Gamma Knife surgery continues to be the preferred method for minimally invasive treatment of many brain disorders, particularly metastases," says Dan Leksell, MD, son of Lars Leksell and Senior Advisor at Elekta. "Leksell Gamma Knife has evolved to provide increasingly greater degrees of precision and a more streamlined workflow. At the upcoming meeting, we will hear how Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion is helping patients, and adding new indications through the Extend™ program that weren't possible to treat before this system's introduction."
Presentations to feature clinical and Workflow advantages of Perfexion and Extend program
Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion is a stereotactic radiosurgery system for brain and head targets that streamlines radiosurgery workflow and expands the treatable volume through an automated, multi-source collimator. Perfexion provides rapid set-up and treatment delivery to one or more tumors in a single session, and the potential to treat lesions anywhere in the head. The Extend program for Perfexion enables clinicians to treat–over two to five radiosurgery sessions–patients with larger tumors or lesions close to critical structures located in the brain, skull base and in other head/neck regions. Extend non-invasively fixes or immobilizes the patient's head, making hypofractionated Gamma Knife surgery practical for these cases.
Additional speakers will present their clinical experience using Leksell Gamma Knife to treat acoustic neuromas, benign and malignant tumors—particularly metastases—skull base lesions, AVMs and functional disorders.
Radiosurgery pioneers to be honored
The Pioneers in Radiosurgery Award will be presented to two clinicians who have made significant contributions to the advancement of radiosurgery and/or minimally invasive neurosurgery. In addition, Professor Ladislau Steiner, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Neurosurgery and Radiology at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center will present the Lars Leksell Lecture. Director of UVA's Gamma Knife Center, Dr. Steiner was a trusted associate of Swedish professor and neurosurgeon Lars Leksell, inventor of the radiosurgical instrument that bears his name.
About the Leksell Gamma Knife Society
The Leksell Gamma Knife Society was established in 1989 to provide a forum for Gamma Knife users to share information, experiences, clinical techniques and advanced scientific research in their quest to non-invasively treat an expanding number of brain disorders. The biennial meeting results in a large number of clinical publications, in recent years published as a supplement to Journal of Neurosurgery. The Society plays an important role in increasing the visibility and acceptance of Gamma Knife surgery in the worldwide medical community, among healthcare providers and among patients. The open sharing of results and experiences allows all Gamma Knife users to maintain leadership in the field of intracranial radiosurgery, based on the most recent clinical advancements.
About Gamma Knife surgery
Gamma Knife surgery is performed in hundreds of leading hospitals and clinics around the world. Around 50,000 patients undergo Gamma Knife surgery every year, and this unique procedure has an impressive scientific track record with thousands of peer-reviewed articles. No other non-invasive treatment method in this field has greater clinical acceptance. View recent worldwide Gamma Knife Surgery statistics.
About Elekta
Elekta is a human care company pioneering significant innovations and clinical solutions for treating cancer and brain disorders. The company develops sophisticated, state-of-the-art tools and treatment planning systems for radiation therapy and radiosurgery, as well as workflow enhancing software systems across the spectrum of cancer care.
Stretching the boundaries of science and technology, providing intelligent and resource-efficient solutions that offer confidence to both healthcare providers and patients, Elekta aims to improve, prolong and even save patient lives, making the future possible today.
Today, Elekta solutions in oncology and neurosurgery are used in over 5,000 hospitals globally, and every day more than 100,000 patients receive diagnosis, treatment or follow-up with the help of a solution from the Elekta Group.
Elekta employs around 2,500 employees globally. The corporate headquarter is located in Stockholm, Sweden, and the company is listed on the Nordic Exchange under the ticker EKTAb. For more information about Elekta, please visit www.elekta.com.

Mayo Clinic Finds Stereotactic Radiosurgery is Safe and Effective for Selected Children with Arteriovenous Malformations


A new Mayo Clinic study has found that Gamma Knife™ stereotactic radiosurgery is a safe and effective option for selected children with arteriovenous malformations. This study was presented at the American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting in Philadelphia last week. An intracranial arteriovenous malformation is an abnormal tangle of blood vessels in the brain. Normally, oxygen-rich blood enters the brain through arteries, which branch into smaller arterioles and subsequently to capillaries, the smallest blood vessels. Oxygen is removed from blood in the capillaries and used by the brain, and then blood passes into small venules and into larger veins that drain the blood from the brain to the heart and lungs. In an arteriovenous malformation, the blood passes directly from arteries to veins via the abnormal vessels, and the brain is not allowed to absorb oxygen from the blood, which can result in stroke-like symptoms, seizures or other symptoms. Arteriovenous malformations appear to be congenital (present at birth). About 0.14 percent of the population has an arteriovenous malformation.
“Blood flow through an arteriovenous malformation puts pressure on the abnormal vessels within the malformation which can rupture and cause bleeding within the brain,” says Bruce Pollock, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon and study author. “Using stereotactic radiosurgery, focused radiation is directed to the arteriovenous malformation causing the vessels to slowly block off over several years and the majority of patients are protected from the risk of intracranial bleeding.”
Dr. Pollock and a team of Mayo Clinic researchers collected data from 48 patients, ages 18 or under, who had Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery for an arteriovenous malformation between 1990 and 2007 and had more than 12 months of follow-up data. Twenty-seven patients (57 percent) had a previous brain hemorrhage, and 15 of the arteriovenous malformations were in deep locations. The team found that 52 percent (25 patients) had obliteration of the malformation after their initial radiosurgery. Repeat radiosurgery was performed in 12 patients, five of whom had obliteration, for a total obliteration rate of 63 percent. Three patients had radiation-related deficits after initial or repeat radiosurgery, but no patients had arteriovenous malformation bleeding, neuro-cognitive decline or radiation-induced tumor after radiosurgery.
“Our 20-year experience with arteriovenous malformation radiosurgery has shown that the risks commonly associated with radiation exposure in children or adolescents are extremely low,” says Dr. Pollock. “We believe that Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery is a safe treatment option for many children with arteriovenous malformations.”
The Mayo Clinic research team also included Michael Link, M.D., and Paula Schomberg, M.D.
To request an appointment at Mayo Clinic, please call 480-422-1490 for the Arizona campus, 904-494-6484 for the Florida campus, or 507-216-4573 for the Minnesota campus.
About Mayo Clinic
For more than 100 years, millions of people from all walks of life have found answers at Mayo Clinic. These patients tell us they leave Mayo Clinic with peace of mind knowing they received care from the world's leading experts. Mayo Clinic is the first and largest integrated, not-for-profit group practice in the world. At Mayo Clinic, a team of specialists is assembled to take the time to listen, understand and care for patients' health issues and concerns. These teams draw from more than 3,700 physicians and scientists and 50,100 allied staff that work at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Minnesota, Florida, and Arizona; and community-based providers in more than 70 locations in southern Minnesota, western Wisconsin and northeast Iowa. These locations treat more than half a million people each year. To best serve patients, Mayo Clinic works with many insurance companies, does not require a physician referral in most cases and is an in-network provider for millions of people. To obtain the latest news releases from Mayo Clinic, go to www.mayoclinic.org/news. For information about research and education, visit www.mayo.edu. MayoClinic.com (www.mayoclinic.com) is available as a resource for your general health information.



Mayo Clinic
Elizabeth Rice, 507-284-5005 (days) or 507-284-2511 (evening)
e-mail: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannomas .

Lim YJ, Choi SK.

Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Kyunghee University, Seoul, Korea. youngjinns@yahoo.co.kr

Abstract
Vestibular schwannoma (VS) is a benign tumor typically originated in the schwann cell of vestibular nerve and usually accompany hearing symptom. Microsurgical removal and radiosurgery have a great role for the treatment of VS. Recently radiosurgery has been considered as an alternative or primary treatment for VS with the tremendous increase of patients who were treated with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) though microsurgery still takes the premier. By many published results, it is proved that GKS is a effective and noninvasive technique for VS, especially small sized tumors with satisfactory tumor control rate.

Gamma Knife Effectively Treats Intractable Cancer Pain, Essential Tremors


The LI Gamma Knife’s interdisciplinary team of neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, physicists, and nurses have expanded the use of the Gamma Knife to treat intractable cancer pain as well as essential tremors (ET).
Since opening Long Island Gamma Knife® in 2002, nearly 1,000 patients have received Gamma Knife treatment at South Nassau, including patients with trigeminal neuralgia, arteriovenous malformations (AVM's) and a wide variety of tumors.

The LI Gamma Knife has expanded the use of the Gamma Knife to treat intractable cancer pain and essential tremors (ET).

Intractable cancer pain (also referred to as thalamic pain syndrome) is considered to be incurable. Cancer pain may be caused by the cancer itself or it could result from the treatment. Pain lasting more than a few days or longer may be caused by a tumor putting pressure on organs, nerves or bone; poor blood circulation because the cancer has blocked blood vessels; blockage of an organ or tube in the body; metastasis – cancer cells that have spread to other sites in the body; infection or inflammation; side effects from chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery; and stiffness from inactivity.

Treatment regimens including medication (chemical hypophysectomy) and functional neurosurgery (surgical hypophysectomy) have been used to control intractable cancer pain without much short- or long-term success. Gamma Knife Pituitary Radiosurgery (GKPR) or Gamma Knife hypophysectomy has proven to be an effective alternative and it is being used with increasing frequency to bring short- and long-term pain relief to cancer patients without any secondary side effects.

The pituitary gland is called the "master gland" because it controls all other glands, constantly monitoring body functions and sending signals to organs and glands to control their function and to maintain the appropriate environment in the body. GKPR delivers a single high dose of radiation to the pituitary, ablating or creating a lesion in the gland, eradicating the sensation of pain. (Gamma Knife radiosurgery of the pituitary gland is used as a last resort. It is known that even partial destruction of the pituitary gland can improve cancer-induced chronic pain from hormonally dependent metastatic tumors.)
Essential Tremors (ET) affects millions of children and adults. ET most often affect the hands, but may also affect the head and neck, face, jaw, tongue, voice (causing a shaking or quivering sound), and the trunk. Most people with ETs have an episode when the body or a part of the body is held in a certain position (referred to as postural tremor) or when performing a particular action such as writing or eating (action-specific tremor). Approximately 1 in 20 people older than age 40 and 1 in 5 people over 65 have ETs.

Gamma Knife Thalamotomy (GKT) is a safe and precise intervention that results in life-altering improvements in cases of ETs. GKT treats the thalamus, a tiny area of the brain that controls some involuntary movements. After GKT, 90% of patients with ETs have experienced a clinically meaningful improvement in their ET score, with 50-78% of patients reporting either no or slight or very slight intermittent ETs.

Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery Is Promising for Patients With Pituitary Adenoma: Presented at AANS

By Liz Meszaros

PHILADELPHIA -- May 5, 2010 -- Gamma-knife radiosurgery may effectively achieve tumour control in patients who have recurrent residual pituitary adenoma, researchers stated here at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS).

"Radiosurgery is an excellent treatment option for patients with recurrent or residual pituitary tumours," noted investigator Jason P. Sheehan, MD, PhD, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, speaking here on May 3. "It offers a high rate of tumour and endocrine control. As such, it allows most patients to avoid repeat open surgery or lifelong, expensive medical management."


Swedish Cancer Institute and Elekta Launch Renewed Partnership Agreement

Swedish Cancer Institute and Elekta Launch Renewed Partnership Agreement to Continue the Flow of World-Class Technology, Services to Cancer Patients in the Pacific Northwest and Beyond

Swedish Cancer Institute (Seattle) and Elekta recently finalized a strategic partnership to launch a major new cancer-care initiative to transform radiation oncology delivery for cancer patients. This unique, multi-year, multi-product collaboration covers the spectrum of cancer management – from treatment planning and delivery to workflow and connectivity – and enhances Swedish Cancer Institute’s ability to provide patients access to state-of-the-art technology early in the product introduction cycle.

This partnership agreement, which is among the most comprehensive in Elekta’s history, includes Swedish’s acquisition of multiple cancer management solutions, including radiation-therapy treatment systems, treatment planning workstations, electronic medical record systems, clinical service, and a Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ (radiosurgery) system. Elekta will also provide expertise in process transformation, technology enablement and strategic marketing.

Officials from Swedish and Elekta believe the combination of both organizations’ collective expertise, talents and resources will help deliver transformational benefits to the Cancer Institute’s patient population and solidify the 78-year-old program’s reputation as a leading destination for world-class care.

“When new products role out, they will do so with key input from Swedish Cancer Institute physicians and our treatment team,” says Jim Yates, administrative director at Swedish. “This will help make those solutions more resource-efficient and allow for quicker, smoother integration into the community cancer center settings.”

Elekta President and CEO Tomas Puusepp says the agreement is mutually beneficial for both organizations. “Elekta will contribute its innovative technologies and significant experience in the oncology marketplace to further elevate Swedish’s position as a cancer-care leader. And in turn, Elekta will benefit from the unique opportunity to partner with one of the most forward-thinking cancer-care institutions in the United States.”

Elekta’s Jim Rose, Vice President of Comprehensive Oncology Solutions, adds that the partnership is a natural fit because both parties have closely aligned missions and values when it comes to improving human care.

“We both strongly believe that a world-class center of excellence requires world-class providers who work tirelessly to ensure that state-of-the-art technology delivers ever-increasing benefits to patients,” Rose says.

Swedish Cancer Institute has a long history of early adoption of radiation treatment technology. Through its Center for Advanced Targeted Radiotherapies (CATRT), Swedish Cancer Institute works collaboratively with technology partners to optimize clinical tools and practices early in the innovation cycle.

“Our position as a leading, non-profit health-care provider means we have an obligation to explore new solutions that contribute to making health-care delivery more efficient and effective. Embarking on this type of partnership with Elekta, the major provider of radiation oncology technology, will allow us to help steer the future of technology and its integration into community cancer centers,” says Swedish CEO Dr. Rod Hochman.

“Swedish Cancer Institute continues to build on its track record for radiation oncology innovation and excellent patient care. This unprecedented partnership will allow Elekta’s development engineers to have access to clinical radiation oncology experts and should result in a better, more improved product,” says Vivek Mehta, M.D., director of the CATRT at Swedish Cancer Institute.

Elekta will also deploy its technology and strategy experts alongside Swedish Cancer Institute’s key physicians, clinicians and administrators to ensure the highest priority is placed on implementing successive phases of the agreement.

In addition, the partnership includes establishment of Swedish Cancer Institute as a customer training facility, clinical product development center, and global reference site for Elekta.

###

For further information, please contact:
Stina Thorman, Vice President Corporate Communications, Elekta AB
Tel: +46 8 587 254 37, email: stina.thorman@elekta.com
Time zone: CET: Central European

Michelle Lee, Director, Global Public Relations and Brand Management, Elekta
Tel: +1 770-670-2447, email: michelle.lee@elekta.com
Time zone: EDT: Eastern Daylight

Ed Boyle, Media Relations Manger, Swedish and Swedish Cancer Institute
Tel: +1 206-386-2748, e-mail: ed.boyle@swedish.org
Time zone: PST (Pacific Standard)


About Elekta
Elekta is a human-care company pioneering significant innovations and clinical solutions for treating cancer and brain disorders. The company develops sophisticated, state-of-the-art tools and treatment-planning systems for radiation therapy and radiosurgery, as well as workflow-enhancing software systems across the spectrum of cancer care.
Stretching the boundaries of science and technology, providing intelligent and resource-efficient solutions that offer confidence to both health-care providers and patients, Elekta aims to improve, prolong and even save patient lives, making the future possible today.
Today, Elekta solutions in oncology and neurosurgery are used in over 5,000 hospitals globally, and every day more than 100,000 patients receive diagnosis, treatment or follow-up with the help of a solution from the Elekta Group.
Elekta employs around 2,500 employees globally. The corporate headquarter is located in Stockholm, Sweden, and the company is listed on the Nordic Exchange under the ticker EKTAb. For more information about Elekta, visit www.elekta.com.

About Swedish
Established in 1910, Swedish has grown to become the largest, most comprehensive non-profit health provider in the Greater Seattle area over its 100-year history. Today, it is comprised of three hospital campuses – First Hill, Cherry Hill and Ballard – a freestanding emergency department and ambulatory care center in Issaquah, Swedish Visiting Nurse Services, the Swedish Physician Division – a network of more than 40 primary-care and specialty clinics located throughout the Puget Sound area. This fall, Swedish broke ground on a new medical office building and hospital in the Issaquah Highlands, as well as a new emergency department and medical office building in Ballard. In addition to general medical and surgical care, Swedish is known as a regional referral center, providing specialized treatment in areas such as cancer care, neuroscience, cardiovascular care, orthopedics, high-risk obstetrics, pediatric specialties, general and robotic-assisted surgery, organ transplantation and clinical research. For more information, visit www.swedish.org and www.swedish100.org.

About Swedish Cancer Institute
Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI) opened in 1932 as the first dedicated cancer-care center west of the Mississippi River. Since then, it has grown to become the largest, most comprehensive cancer treatment program in the Pacific Northwest. The Institute has a presence on all three of Swedish’s hospital campuses as well as in East King County through a medical oncology clinic near Issaquah. A true multidisciplinary program, SCI offers a wide range of advanced cancer-treatment options in chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery – backed by extensive diagnostic capabilities, patient education and support-group services. The Institute’s clinical-research arm includes industry-sponsored and cooperative group therapeutic trials, cancer screening and prevention trials, and investigator-initiated trials. Breast-cancer screening and diagnostics are available through the Swedish Breast Care Centers and two state-of-the-art mobile mammography coaches. Swedish radiation therapy is also offered at various Puget Sound-area community hospitals including Stevens Hospital (Edmonds), Valley Medical Center (Renton), Highline Community Hospital (Burien), and Northwest Hospital (North Seattle). For more information, visit www.swedish.org

About SCI’s Center for Advanced Targeted Radiotherapies
SCI’s Center for Advanced Targeted Radiotherapies encompasses the comprehensive and complementary array of advanced and emerging radiation delivery tools available to patients for both approved therapies and clinical-research efforts. That includes technologies such as Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy, Image-Guided Radiation Therapy, linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery, the Calypso® 4D Localization System, Xoft Axxent™ Electronic Brachytherapy System, MammoSite® Radiation Therapy System, and the Seattle CyberKnife Center™ at Swedish. SCI is also working toward adding the latest generation of proton beam radiotherapy systems.

Sterotactic radiosurgery seems to treat large acoustic neuromas

Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery, which is an approved treatment for small to medium-sized acoustic neuromas, appears to have been a successful treatment for large acoustic neuromas too. A Mayo Clinic study, revealed that majority of patients, suffering from large acoustic neuromas, also known as vestibular schwannoma or neurolemmoma may probably be treated by Gamma Knife surgery
.

Acoustic neuroma which is a noncancerous tissue arises on a cranial nerve leading from the brain to the inner ear. It is this nerve, which is responsible in transmitting sound and balance information from the inner ear to the brain. Hearing loss, dizziness and ringing in the ears are some of the common symptoms faced by a patient suffering from acoustic neuroma. There are several treatments available like observation, surgical removal and stereotactic radiosurgery. Every year, more than 2,200 patients are provided with care and attention by the Mayo Clinic neurologists and neurosurgeons.

Michael Link, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon and study author, stated, “Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery allows us to perform neurosurgery without an incision. Instead, we use gamma radiation to destroy diseased tissue while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. It is typically a short procedure and most patients can be discharged from the hospital the same day.”

Mayo Clinic Finds Stereotactic Radiosurgery is Successful for Most Patients with Large Acoustic Neuromas

ROCHESTER, Minn. -A new Mayo Clinic study has found that Gamma Knife™ stereotactic radiosurgery is a successful treatment for the majority of patients who have large acoustic neuromas (also known as vestibular schwannoma or neurolemmoma). Gamma Knife surgery already is an accepted treatment for small to medium-sized acoustic neuromas. This study was presented at the American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting in Philadelphia this week. 

An acoustic neuroma is a noncancerous tissue growth that arises on a cranial nerve leading from the brain to the inner ear. This nerve is associated with transmitting sound and sending balance information to the brain from the inner ear. Symptoms of acoustic neuromas may include hearing loss, dizziness and ringing in the ears. Treatment options include observation, surgical removal and stereotactic radiosurgery. Each year, Mayo Clinic neurologists and neurosurgeons care for more than 2,200 patients with brain and nervous system tumors, including many with acoustic neuromas. 

“Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery allows us to perform neurosurgery without an incision,” says Michael Link, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon and study author. “Instead, we use gamma radiation to destroy diseased tissue while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. It is typically a short procedure and most patients can be discharged from the hospital the same day.”
Dr. Link and a team of Mayo Clinic researchers collected data from 34 patients who had Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery for a large acoustic neuroma between 1997 and 2006. These individuals’ acoustic neuromas represented tumor volumes that were considered large (one standard deviation above the mean). At three years, 89.4 percent of these patients had not experienced tumor progression, 91.6 percent were free of new facial neuropathy and 52.8 percent had preserved functional hearing. At five years, the rates decreased to 82.9 percent with no tumor recurrence or progression, 86.4 percent free of new facial neuropathy and 34.5 percent with preserved functional hearing. At the most recent follow-up, 85 percent of the tumors were smaller than at the time of stereotactic radiosurgery. 

“This data shows us that Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery is a very well-tolerated, successful treatment for the majority of patients with large acoustic neuromas,” says Dr. Link. “However, it should be noted that with large acoustic neuromas, the rates of cranial nerve disability and tumor progression are higher, compared to patients with smaller tumors. Therefore, careful consideration of all the available treatment options needs to be entertained before making a treatment decision.” 

The Mayo Clinic research team also included Brian Milligan, M.D., Robert Foote, M.D., and Bruce Pollock, M.D. 

To request an appointment at Mayo Clinic, please call 480-422-1490 for the Arizona campus, 904-494-6484 for the Florida campus, or 507-216-4573 for the Minnesota campus. 

About Mayo Clinic
For more than 100 years, millions of people from all walks of life have found answers at Mayo Clinic. These patients tell us they leave Mayo Clinic with peace of mind knowing they received care from the world's leading experts. Mayo Clinic is the first and largest integrated, not-for-profit group practice in the world. At Mayo Clinic, a team of specialists is assembled to take the time to listen, understand and care for patients' health issues and concerns. These teams draw from more than 3,700 physicians and scientists and 50,100 allied staff that work at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Minnesota, Florida, and Arizona; and community-based providers in more than 70 locations in southern Minnesota, western Wisconsin and northeast Iowa. These locations treat more than half a million people each year. To best serve patients, Mayo Clinic works with many insurance companies, does not require a physician referral in most cases and is an in-network provider for millions of people. To obtain the latest news releases from Mayo Clinic, go to www.mayoclinic.org/news. For information about research and education, visit www.mayo.edu. MayoClinic.com (www.mayoclinic.com) is available as a resource for your general health information.


Mayo Clinic
Elizabeth Rice, 507-538-7982

Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Yields Promising Results in Patients with Pituitary Adenomas

Source: American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS)  
 
In 2009, it was estimated that a total of 22,070 new cases of brain and other CNS tumors were diagnosed. Pituitary adenomas represent one of the most common brain tumors. Large studies report that approximately 10-20 percent of the population harbors a pituitary tumor. According to the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States, 13.4 percent of all brain and CNS tumors diagnosed in 2009 were located in the pituitary. Although surgical resection and medical management can be used to treat certain types of pituitary tumors, recurrent or residual tumors are not uncommon and frequently require treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery.
Swedish physician and professor of neurosurgery at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Lars Leksell treated the first pituitary adenoma patient with the Gamma Knife® in 1968. Since then, Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been used to treat thousands of patients with a recurrent or residual pituitary adenoma. Many single center, retrospective studies have documented its efficacy. Unfortunately, most reports consist of fewer than 100 patients, making statistical analysis of such small groups problematic.
Researchers at the University of Virginia Health Science Center in Charlottesville, Va. and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, evaluated the efficacy of GKRS in a total of 418 radiosurgery patients. The results of this study, Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Pituitary Adenomas: Factors Related to Radiologic and Endocrine Outcomes in a Series of 400+ Patients, will be presented by Jason P. Sheehan, MD, PhD, 5:01 to 5:15 pm, Monday, May 3, 2010, during the 78th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons in Philadelphia. Co-authors are Nader Pouratian, MD, PhD, Edward R. Laws Jr., MD, and Mary Lee Vance, MD. Dr. Sheehan will be presented with the Synthes Skull Base Award for this research.
The current study evaluates the largest group of radiosurgery patients with a pituitary adenoma, to date, analyzing factors related to endocrine remission, control of tumor growth, and development of pituitary deficiency. Included in this study were patients with a minimum follow-up of 6 months (median 31 months). Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for significant factors (p<0.05) related to treatment outcomes. The following results were noted:
•In 90.3 percent of patients, there was tumor control (i.e. no growth or tumor shrinkage). A higher radiation dose significantly resulted in tumor shrinkage.
•In patients with a secretory (i.e. functioning) pituitary adenoma such as in Cushing’s disease or acromegaly, the median time to endocrine remission was 48.9 months. A higher radiation dose correlated with a faster time to endocrine remission.
•Smaller adenoma size correlated with improved endocrine response in those patients with secretory adenomas. Temporarily halting pituitary suppressive medications at the time of radiosurgery led to an improvement in endocrine response.
•New onset of a pituitary hormone deficiency following radiosurgery was seen in 24.4 percent of patients. These patients were placed on hormone supplementation as required. The two most common hormone deficiencies following radiosurgery were thyroid and growth hormone.
“Smaller tumor size improves the chances of endocrine control and lowers the risk of new pituitary hormone deficiency following stereotatic radiosurgery. A higher radiosurgical dose offers a greater chance of endocrine and tumor control,” remarked Dr. Sheehan.
“Radiosurgery is an excellent treatment option for patients with recurrent or residual pituitary tumors. It offers a high rate of tumor and endocrine control. As such, it allows most patients to avoid repeat open surgery or lifelong, expensive medical management,” concluded Dr. Sheehan.
Founded in 1931 as the Harvey Cushing Society, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) is a scientific and educational association with more than 7,600 members worldwide. The AANS is dedicated to advancing the specialty of neurological surgery in order to provide the highest quality of neurosurgical care to the public. All active members of the AANS are certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons (Neurosurgery) of Canada or the Mexican Council of Neurological Surgery, AC. Neurological surgery is the medical specialty concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of disorders that affect the entire nervous system, including the spinal column, spinal cord, brain and peripheral nerves.

Gamma Knife Effectively Treats Intractable Cancer Pain, Essential Tremors

The LI Gamma Knife’s interdisciplinary team of neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, physicists, and nurses have expanded the use of the Gamma Knife to treat intractable cancer pain as well as essential tremors (ET).

Since opening Long Island Gamma Knife® in 2002, nearly 1,000 patients have received Gamma Knife treatment at South Nassau, including patients with trigeminal neuralgia, arteriovenous malformations (AVM's) and a wide variety of tumors such as pituitary tumors, acoustic neuromas, meningiomas, metastatic brain tumors, and primary brain tumors.

The LI Gamma Knife’s interdisciplinary team of neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, physicists, and nurses, who are specially trained in performing Gamma Knife procedures, have expanded the use of the Gamma Knife to treat intractable cancer pain as well as essential tremors (ET).

“The Gamma Knife incorporates leading-edge technologies that enable us to treat a variety of debilitating and life-threatening conditions,” said Edward Mullen, MD, South Nassau’s chair of radiation oncology and co-medical director of Long Island Gamma Knife.  “When we invested in this life-saving technology it was with the knowledge that it would be of great benefit to the communities we serve and that it provided us the capability to effectively and efficiently treat a gamut of disorders including brain tumors, malformations, and other conditions.”

Intractable cancer pain (also referred to as thalamic pain syndrome) is considered to be incurable.  The American Alliance of Cancer Pain Initiatives (AACPI) defines intractable cancer pain as “a pain state in which the cause of the pain cannot be removed or otherwise treated and in which, in the generally accepted course of medical practice, no relief or cure of the cause of the pain is possible, or none has been found after reasonable efforts.”

Cancer pain may be caused by the cancer itself or it could result from the treatment. Pain lasting more than a few days or longer may be caused by a tumor putting pressure on organs, nerves or bone; poor blood circulation because the cancer has blocked blood vessels; blockage of an organ or tube in the body; metastasis – cancer cells that have spread to other sites in the body; infection or inflammation; side effects from chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery; and stiffness from inactivity.

Treatment regimens including medication (chemical hypophysectomy) and functional neurosurgery (surgical hypophysectomy) have been used to control intractable cancer pain without much short- or long-term success.  Gamma Knife Pituitary Radiosurgery (GKPR) or Gamma Knife hypophysectomy has proven to be an effective alternative and it is being used with increasing frequency to bring short- and long-term pain relief to cancer patients without any secondary side effects.

The pituitary gland is called the "master gland" because it controls all other glands, constantly monitoring body functions and sending signals to organs and glands to control their function and to maintain the appropriate environment in the body.  GKPR delivers a single high dose of radiation to the pituitary, ablating or creating a lesion in the gland, eradicating the sensation of pain.  (Gamma Knife radiosurgery of the pituitary gland is used as a last resort.  It is known that even partial destruction of the pituitary gland can improve cancer-induced chronic pain from hormonally dependent metastatic tumors.)

The Gamma Knife’s 201 intersecting cobalt beams provide a dose of precise radiation equal to 20-30 traditional radiation treatments, in one 45-minute session.  Because of the very steep fall-off of the radiation field outside the specified target area, the dose to immediately surrounding tissue is minimized.

Studies on the effectiveness of GKPR have shown that patients experience significant pain reduction within 48 hours after treatment and that it has long-lasting clinical effect in controlling cancer pain.

Essential Tremors (ET) affects millions of children and adults.  They are not caused by a neurological condition, injury, or side effect of a medication and can become debilitating over time.  ET most often affect the hands, but may also affect the head and neck, face, jaw, tongue, voice (causing a shaking or quivering sound), and the trunk.  ETs are rhythmic, back-and-forth or to-and-from movements that are caused by an involuntary (uncontrollable) contraction of muscles.  The episodes and duration of ETs vary from hour to hour and day to day.  Most people with ETs have an episode when the body or a part of the body is held in a certain position (referred to as postural tremor) or when performing a particular action such as writing or eating (action-specific tremor).  Approximately 1 in 20 people older than age 40 and 1 in 5 people over 65 have ETs.  It is estimated that ETs are eight to ten times more common than Parkinson's.  Only stroke disease is more common.

Gamma Knife Thalamotomy (GKT) is a safe and precise, non-invasive intervention that has proven to produce life-altering improvements in otherwise unmanageable cases of ETs.  GKT treats the thalamus, a tiny area of the brain that controls some involuntary movements.  After GKT, 90% of patients with ETs have experienced a clinically meaningful improvement in their ET score, with 50-78% of patients reporting either no or very slight intermittent ETs.  Patients with multiple sclerosis have also reported significant improvement with their ETs, increasing their ability to perform acts of daily living (routine activities that people do everyday) without needing assistance.

Since Gamma Knife surgery is minimally invasive, the lengthy hospital stays associated with brain surgery are avoided. Patients return home the same day of treatment, and can usually resume their normal activities, including working and driving, within days. There is little risk of potential morbidity, such as hemorrhage and infection, that is associated with conventional surgery.  More than 30 years of clinical studies documented in multiple published, peer-reviewed articles have shown that the Gamma Knife has clear benefits compared to traditional neurosurgery.

“Our track record and tradition of excellence is attributable to our team’s acumen and experience and commitment to patient-centered treatment plans that maximize the benefits of the technology,” said Michael Brisman, MD, co-medical director of the Long Island Gamma Knife.  

South Nassau was the first (and is currently the only) hospital on Long Island to use the Gamma Knife.  For additional information on the Long Island Gamma Knife, or to arrange for an evaluation, please call 1-866-LI GAMMA.

# # #

South Nassau Communities Hospital is one of the region’s largest hospitals, with 435 beds, more than 875 physicians and 2,800 employees. Located in Oceanside, NY, the hospital is an acute-care, not-for-profit teaching hospital that provides state-of-the-art care in cardiac, oncologic, orthopedic, bariatric, pain management, mental health and emergency services. In addition to its extensive outpatient specialty centers, South Nassau boasts Long Island’s first and only Gamma KnifeĆ¢ and provides emergency and elective angioplasty. South Nassau is a designated Stroke Center by the New York State Department of Health and Comprehensive Community Cancer Center by the American College of Surgeons and is recognized as a Bariatric Surgery Center of Excellence by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. For more information, visit www.southnassau.org.

Stereotactic Radiosurgery in India: Get it

By: Healthcare

What is stereotactic radiosurgery?

Stereotactic radiosurgery is a highly precise form of radiation therapy used primarily to treat tumors and other abnormalities of the brain. Despite its name, stereotactic radiosurgery is a non-surgical procedure that uses highly focused x-rays to treat certain types of tumors, inoperable lesions and as a post-operative treatment to eliminate any leftover tumor tissue.

The treatment involves the delivery of a single high-dose—or sometimes smaller, multiple doses—of radiation beams that converge on the specific area of the brain where the tumor or other abnormality resides. Using a helmet-like device that keeps the head completely still and three-dimensional computer-aided planning software, stereotactic radiosurgery minimizes the amount of radiation to healthy brain tissue.

Stereotactic radiosurgery is an important alternative to invasive surgery, especially for tumors and blood vessel abnormalities located deep within or close to vital areas of the brain. Radiosurgery is used to treat many types of brain tumors, both benign or malignant and primary or metastatic. Additionally, radiosurgery is used to treat arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), a tangle of expanded blood vessels that disrupts normal blood flow in the brain and is the leading cause of stroke in young people.
Although stereotactic radiosurgery is often completed in a one-day session, physicians sometimes recommend a fractionated treatment, in which treatments are given over a period of days or weeks. This is referred to as stereotactic radiotherapy.

Stereotactic radiosurgery works in the same way as other forms of radiation treatment. It does not actually remove the tumor; rather, it distorts the DNA of tumor cells. As a result, these cells lose their ability to reproduce. Following the treatment, benign tumors usually shrink over a period of 18 months to two years. Malignant and metastatic tumors may shrink more rapidly, even within a couple of months. When treated with radiosurgery, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) begin to thicken and close off.
How is the procedure performed?

Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using the Gamma Knife

Gamma Knife radiosurgery involves four phases: placement of the head frame, imaging of tumor location, computerized dose planning, and radiation delivery.

In the first phase, a box-shaped head frame is attached to your skull using specially designed pins to keep your head from moving until the treatment session is finished. This lightweight aluminum head frame is a guiding device that makes sure the Gamma Knife beams are focused exactly where the treatment is needed.
Next, you will be taken to an imaging area where a computed tomography (CT) scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be performed to show the exact location of the tumor in relation to the head frame.
During the next phase, you will be able to relax for an hour or two while your treatment team performs a computer-aided treatment plan that will optimally radiate the tumor.

Next, you will lie down on the Gamma Knife bed where your physician will describe the number and length of treatments to expect. Your head frame will then be attached to a helmet that has several hundred holes in it to allow individual rays of radiation to target specific areas of the brain.


The treatment team will then go to another room so that your treatment can begin. You will be able to talk to your physician through a microphone in the helmet and a camera will allow the team to see you at all times. The bed you are lying on will move backward into the treatment area. You may hear a chime at this point and a click as the helmet locks into the radiation source. When the treatment is complete, the bed will return to its original position. The total treatment may last two to four hours. Once your treatment is completed, your head frame will be removed.
Radiosurgery Using the Linear Accelerator

Linear accelerator (LINAC) radiosurgery is similar to the Gamma Knife procedure and its four phases: head frame placement, imaging, computerized dose planning and radiation delivery. Unlike the Gamma Knife, which remains motionless during the procedure, part of the LINAC machine called a gantry rotates around the patient, delivering radiation beams from different angles. Compared to the Gamma Knife, the LINAC is able to use a larger x-ray beam, which enables it to treat larger tumors more uniformly and with less repositioning.

India, which is one of the most sought after medical tourism destinations in the world, has patients from over 60 counties getting stereotactic radiosurgery in various hospitals at Delhi, Chennai, Mumbai and Hyderabad. Reasons varying from lower cost of Stereotactic radiosurgery in India and shorter waiting period for surgeries are cited as reasons for India becoming a hot destination for the health tourists, mainly from the West and Gulf. Stereotactic radiosurgery in India offers remarkable cost savings. The savings are a function of where you travel for surgery. India is currently one of the cheapest places for stereotactic radiosurgery in the world. With the cost savings you can visit to the various exotic tourist locations. India is a heritage country there are many things to explore, most of the international patients choose India for their treatment so that they can visit the famous tourist places after their surgery. For more details on Stereotactic radiosurgery in India visit http://www.forerunnershealthcare.com and enquiry@forerunnershealthcare.com
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I am Doctor and international health consultant
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